spanish-language-btn
whatsapp-btn
Infoteca-Header
img2

Music education in New Zealand needs a reset, experts say



February 15, 2021

Nueva Zelanda/Por: Andre Chumko/Fuente: https://www.stuff.co.nz/

The entertainment promoter, Gray Bartlett, says immigration decision-makers are playing favourites over which overseas music and comedy acts are being allowed into the country.

New Zealand’s music education system needs a reset to make sure budding musicians have access to proper training and to instruments, music experts say.

Orchestras are concerned about a lack of conductors within New Zealand and difficulties getting New Zealand Symphony Orchestra (NZSO) players into the country could have “long-term negative impacts” on the sector, a Ministry for Culture and Heritage briefing concluded late last year.

“It remains hit-and-miss as to whether [talent] is discovered early enough and nurtured in the same way that many sporting codes have mastered,” said Euan Murdoch, former chief executive of Chamber Music New Zealand and former director of the New Zealand School of Music.

Trusts and private initiatives are often relied on in NZ to reduce access barriers to instruments.
ROSA WOODS/STUFF
Trusts and private initiatives are often relied on in NZ to reduce access barriers to instruments.

“Over the past few decades, private schools have led the way and under-investment by our ministry has meant that some of our most talented musicians are neither identified nor developed … This is the right time to reset.”

l

Peter Walls, a former chief executive of NZSO and Chamber Music, said there was an “abundance” of talent within New Zealand. But the availability of quality teaching was “just not where it should be”.

ADVERTISEMENT

Advertise with Stuff

While certain schools encouraged and promoted a variety of music programmes for students to participate in alongside traditional classes, others offered very few opportunities, he said.

Peter Walls, former chief executive of New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, says the education ministry needs to rethink the value it places on music altogether.
ROSA WOODS/STUFF
Peter Walls, former chief executive of New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, says the education ministry needs to rethink the value it places on music altogether.

Walls said the education ministry needed to place more value on music altogether, citing research showing music education helps other forms of learning.

As a result of the “spotty” system – where a postcode could often make the difference between a quality grounding in music or not – private initiatives are established to help remove access barriers to instruments, which can often fall beyond household budgets.

One of these, the Michael Hill International Violin Competition Trust, has recently created a “bank” to pair young musicians with unused string instruments.

Its executive director, Anne Rodda, said private music education was expensive .

The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra recently expressed to the culture ministry it was concerned about a lack of conducting talent in NZ. It also raised the issue of rejected exemptions for returning international-based players.
ROSA WOODS/STUFF
The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra recently expressed to the culture ministry it was concerned about a lack of conducting talent in NZ. It also raised the issue of rejected exemptions for returning international-based players.

Young Kiwi musicians were of an “extraordinarily high calibre”, despite the country’s traditional school systems giving them a “holistic” training base in many areas, she said.

What the broad-brush approach results in is some teachers being “extremely narrowly focussed” on particular genres, while completely ignoring others,” said Michael Lawrence, head of music of St Andrew’s College in Christchurch for 25 years.

Schools also may struggle to supply students with a full range of instruments, which can discourage participation altogether. “How do we get music education covering everything?” he said.

“We need to invest more in training teachers for schools and invest in participatory music programmes for all schools so that every child in the country can access these opportunities,” said Euan Murdoch, former chief executive of Chamber Music New Zealand.
SUPPLIED
“We need to invest more in training teachers for schools and invest in participatory music programmes for all schools so that every child in the country can access these opportunities,” said Euan Murdoch, former chief executive of Chamber Music New Zealand.

Pauline Cleaver, an education ministry spokeswoman, said it provided support to schools and music teachers to encourage the uptake of music studies.

“We recognise the important and unique opportunities music and the arts offer young people,” she said. “We have heard the feedback from the sector that there is demand for improved arts provision in schools and will consider this as part of our planned refresh of the national curriculum.”

The NCEA level 1 music subject is being developed this year, and will be implemented in 2023.

The ministry didn’t have data on the number of music teachers in New Zealand.

Fuente de la noticia: https://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/music/124210191/music-education-in-new-zealand-needs-a-reset-experts-say




Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



footerImageLight
AVISO DE PRIVACIDAD
TÉRMINOS LEGALES
CORPORATIVO SEDE / MÉXICO
Av. Rancho del Jacal 100, Santa Rosa de Lima, C.P. 54740
Cuautitlán Izcalli, Estado de México, México
TELÉFONO: 52 (55) 5089 7270 Ext. 1231
CORREO: contacto@palech.org